understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions.

create and debug simple programs

2.3a

LO: To draw a flow chart to represent completing a task

The next few lessons will concentrate on using the tokens worlds (1 - 6).

Here we will introduce two new commands that Reeborg knows; take() to pick up an object and put() to place an object.

The objects in the token worlds are smiley faces but Reeborg's world can contain many others.

The tokens1 world looks like this:

Like we did in 1_3b, we can construct a flow chart to represent the commands we will need to use (starter flow chart file available in the resource section below).

The flow chart for tokens1 would look like this:

For now, we only need to know that the rounded box is used to represent the start and finish and the square box is used to show commands.

In Python this would look like this:

#tokens1
move()
take()
move()
put()
move()

#Reeborg also contains the command done() that you can include at the end of your program - you do not need to include this command as Reeborg will stop after following all the comands anyway, so this code would run in the same way.

#tokens1
move()
take()
move()
put()
move()
done()
			

Children can write flow charts for tokens1, 2, 3 and 4.

Code Examples

Resources